Canada"s IEC program supported by the government draws foreign workers even as it draws local ire

May 01, 2014
The Canadian government's IEC program has both sides, those who support it and those who oppose it

Canada’s government has initiated a program called the International Experience Canada program (the IEC program), under which Canadians can apply and take up a job or employment in any one of the 32 countries comprising a number of foreign countries. Reciprocally, citizens of those 32 countries can also be employed and work in Canada. The employee should be aged between 18 years and 35 years. 

One of the principal features of the IEC program is that it allows the employing company to circumvent the ‘labour market wage standard process’ thus allowing the hirer to not seek the consent of the government to hire the alien worker. The second of the salient features is that the employer does not have to pay/remunerate the hired employee whatever is the current market wage. The third feature is that the worker or employee can work for not more than a year. 

There may be a rush of foreign workers to Canada, even as that country’s own youth will also be seeking employment. It is also quite possible that many from this young work force will be alien workers from Ireland. Also, there may be workers from other countries, as well, such as France, the UK, Germany, Korea, Japan, New Zealand, etc.       
    
There are defendants and opponents of the program (the IEC program). The opponents of the program state that this program is simply a means to allow local Canadian employers to hire cheap alien worker even while ignoring locals who have both the skills and the motivation to work. While this is so, the proponents of the program state that this is an old program in operation/place since 1951, and that it is a two-way program which means it is a reciprocal program (i.e. Canadian workers can take up work in foreign countries, etc.).      
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